Reo Purgyil – Highest Peak of Himachal Pradesh

Reo Purgyil, also known as Leo Pargialand Leo Pargil,] is a mountain peak at the southern end of the Zanskar Range in the Western Himalaya area of the Himalayas.
Reo Purgyil

Reo Purgyil, also known as Leo Pargialand Leo Pargil,] is a mountain peak at the southern end of the Zanskar Range in the Western Himalaya area of the Himalayas. It is located on the Himachal Pradesh/Tibetan border in the Kinnaur district of Himachal Pradesh, India. At 6,816 m Reo Purgyil is the most elevated mountain crest in the territory of Himachal Pradesh. Geologically the peak is a dome structure and is part of a great massif that rises above the Satluj River (Sutlej) and overlooks the western valley of Tibet. The Spiti River, a right hand tributary of the Satluj, drains the northern face of the massif.

The highest peak is often obscured by clouds and is located about 2 km to the south of Peak 6791, a well known slightly shorter twin brother with a height of 6,791 m. Peak 6791 is widely referred to as Leo Pargial and has sufficient topographic prominence to be classified as a mountain in its own right. Nako village is the last road head for this expedition, located on the slopes of the mountain, close to the India-Tibet border.

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Kaurik – Last Village on Indo-Tibetan Border

Kaurik used to be a village bang on the border with Tibet ! Kaurik is still used on milestones along NH 22. It can be easily located on google maps. Kaurik is a mysterious place which was deserted some 25-28 years back in earthquake/flash floods and now you can find ruins of the place if you are ready to hike a bit once the road ends after about 19 KMs. Hoorling village has the largest number of survivors from Kaurik village.

Beyond Kaurik, there is a village called Lepcha which requires you to further hike about an hour or so. Lepcha is the last place in India you can reach and ahead lies Tibet beyond the Indo-Tibet Border ends. Anyhow, Kaurik falls under a restricted area as far as I know and permits are hard to find for Kaurik. The entire area is under ITBP control.

So, the best bet is to land there and ask the permissions from army guys if you can pass through. If they say yes, then go ahead and explore this amazing mysterious place in Spiti Valley.

Pangi & Killar – Valley Full of Grandeur & Tribal Majesty

Pangi
Pangi

The Pangi valley of Chamba district is a serene, quiet area inhabited by a tribal folk of only 17,600 people in Himachal Pradesh at 7000 ft to 11000 ft above sea level. The Saach Pass, which is a mountain pass of 14500 ft, helps the valley with tourism and easy transportation as it offers proper roadways for those who want to travel there. It is open during the months of June and October as it snows heavily throughout the other months.

Pangi Valley in Himachal Pradesh, for some, is a road to heaven. The scenery is sublime and imposing and nature appears in her wildest and grandest moods. Everything is on a stupendous scale. The native Pangwals and Bhotis tribes are both hindu and buddhist also they are robust hardworking people, who keep the valleys unique culture alive in folk songs, music and tribal dances.  

Pangi
Pangi

This hidden valley located between Pir Panjal and the Greater Himalayan Zanskar ranges is cut off from the rest of the world during winter and springs.  Spread over an area of about 1600 sq kms of steep, rocky and tough Himalayan terrain, Pangi is an offbeat and challenging tourist destination. 

Killar

Killar
Killar

Killar, 27 kms from Sach Pass, is the sub-divisional headquarter of Pangi. From here there are a number of exciting and challenging treks to Keylong and Kishtwar in Jammu. Killar was originally a cluster of villages but gradually it has taken the shape of a town with more and more offices and shops added from year to year. Killar is famous for its charming dances and rich natural beauty. It is also a suitable base for trekkers venturing to Kishtwar, through Umasi lainto the Zanskar Valley, and to Keylong and Manali